DISSCUSION 

the authors talk about the challenge of inclusivity in nursing education.  They explain that educators believe we embrace cultural diversity and are committed to meeting the needs of all learners, but the research suggests otherwise.  Our teaching practices have not caught up with our beliefs.  For this week’s assignment, do some research on diverse populations in nursing education. In addition to presenting your research, be sure to address the following:

  • What are the unique challenges/barriers faced by diverse populations in nursing education?  There are many that you can address, but at a minimum, you must address racially and ethnically diverse groups and students with disabilities. 
  • How can mostly white and female nurse educators serve as role models and mentors for diverse populations?

Sources: You can use any of the posted articles and your books as references. Find at least two additional peer-reviewed nursing journal articles that relate to your area of focus. 

Nursing and Health 2(6): 107-114, 2014 http://www.hrpub.org
DOI: 10.13189/nh.2014.020601

Teaching the Millennial Nursing Student: Using a
“Flipping the Classroom” Model

Antoinette Towle1,*, Karen Breda2

1Department of Nursing, Southern Connecticut State University, United States
2Department of Health Sciences and Nursing, University of Hartford, United States

Copyright © 2014 Horizon Research Publishing All rights reserved.

Abstract Working on the front lines of patient care,
nurses play a vital role in helping our nation meet the
objectives of the Future of Nursing IOM report and the
Affordable Care Act. Nursing schools have a new challenge
to prepare students to function in vital roles as leading
change agents in this different environment. Simultaneously,
millennials, a new generation of learners with unique
learning needs have inundated our nursing classrooms. How
best to effectively teach millennial students is a pressing
issue. Millennials think and learn differently than previous
generations and nurse educators are being asked to change
their teaching styles to meet their needs. The purpose of this
article is to introduce the nuts and bolts of “Flipping the
Classroom” as a new approach to teaching millennial
students. This model offers a revolutionary way to teach
millennial nursing students. Designed especially for the
millennial-aged student, “flipping the classroom” can result
in superior learning outcomes, higher knowledge retention,
enhanced critical thinking skills and improved clinical
judgment. “Flipping” in nursing requires educators to move
away from lecturing as the primary way to deliver
information and instead to use various engaging tools and
activities to help students make sense of theory and to
connect key concepts with realistic experiences. It asks
learners to use online resources innovatively and to explore
the material prior to class. “Flipping” sets the platform for
knowledge application in the classroom. Teachers and
students use class time to problem solve, create, critique,
and synthesize in a dynamic and engaging environment.
Ultimately, both nurse educators and students can be
transformed with this unique “flipped” model.

Keywords Millennials, Nursing Education, Flipping the
Classroom

1. Introduction: “Spring Semester
Nursing 422 Scene #1”

It is 8 am, Tuesday morning, on a typical cold, snowy

winter day, the first day of the second semester of the
academic year, and the last semester for 32 soon to be
“graduate nurses.” Students stroll into class, some that look
like they just got up or never went to bed. Students typically
sit in the same seat, near the same classmates, open up their
laptops or cell phones and immediately settle into texting
friends, reading emails, posting pictures and comments on
Facebook, and preparing themselves to relax comfort

White Paper on Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in Nursing Educational
Programs for the California Committee on Employment of

People with Disabilities (CCEPD)

Beth Marks, PhD, RN
Director, HealthMatters Community Academic Partnership (HealthMattersProgram.org) Associate
Associate Director for Research, Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Aging with
Developmental Disabilities (rrtcadd.org)
Research Associate Professor, Department of Disability and Human Development, College of Applied
Health Sciences
Immediate Past President, National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND.org)
University of Illinois at Chicago 1640 West Roosevelt Road, Room 736
Chicago, Illinois 60608
[email protected]

Sarah Ailey, PhD, RN, CDDN APHN-BC
Associate Professor
Rush University
College of Nursing
Department of Community, Systems and Mental Health Nursing
600 S. Paulina #1080
Chicago, IL 60612
[email protected]

We would like to extend our gratitude to Melanie Dreher, RN, PhD, FAAN and Susan Matt, RN, MN, PhD,
JD for providing invaluable information and feedback on the preparation of this document.

White Paper on Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in Nursing Education
Programs and Technical Standards for the California Committee on

Employment of People with Disabilities (CCEPD)

Abstract …………………………………………………………………………………………….. iii

Students with Disabilities in Nursing Education …………………………………………. 1

Social and Legal Changes: Invigorating New Expectations ………………………………………………… 2

Employment Gaps: Expanding Opportunities…………………………………………………………………… 4

Nursing Shortage with a Twist: Fixing a Pipeline in Crisis ………………………………………………….. 4

Barriers and Supports for Students with Disabilities …………………………………… 5

Historical Context: Concretizing Technical Standards …………………..