5. Student-Led Seminar Presentation of the assigned article from Course Point and should be utilizing all teaching-learning processes identified. Please record your presentation and place it on the discussion board for student review.  Each student will generate a reaction to the assigned journal  presentations for course credit.

Please use this rubric for your generated Student-Led Seminar  Presentation:

Criteria

Developing

0 point

Accomplished

1 point

Distinguished

2 points

Content 

Missing requirements

Includes some of the requirements.

Includes ALL assignment requirements

Subject Knowledge

Little or no understanding of subject matter displayed. May or may not have read or understood material.

Understands basic concepts of the subject matter, but in-depth analysis may be lacking or not clearly presented.

Mastery of subject matter is clearly presented.

Quality 

Multimedia element is unclear. If sound is included, it is not easy to understand. 

Multimedia element is clear when sound is included, it is easy understand.

Multimedia elements are essential and clear. If sound is included, it is easy to understand. 

Overall presentation 

The presentation is unclear and difficult to follow.  The logical flow was confusing.  The presentation was overly wordy and robotic.

The presentation is clear and organized.  The visuals are appealing and presented in a thought-provoking manner.

The presentation is clear, engaging and well-organized.  The visuals are appealing.  The logic of the presentation is easy to follow.  All verbal and/or written information is legible, clear and easy to see/hear.

APA 7th Edition

Formatting

Documents sources with no correct APA formatting.

Documents most sources using APA formatting. 

Documents all sources using APA formatting 

Copyright © 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

Team Concepts

Collaborative decision making:
Empowering nurse leaders
By Linda S. Burkett, DNP, MSN, RN, FCN

D ecision making is significant to every pro-

fessional organization, guiding trajectory

and success. Understanding the complexity

of decision making is imperative, as is rec-

ognizing the unique human dimensions inherent

in the decision-making process.1-3 Personality

type directly influences how individuals make

decisions. For this reason, decision making is an

elemental component of the Myers-Briggs Type

Indicator (MBTI), a 93 forced-choice-question

personality assessment tool. Corporations have

been using the MBTI for over 60 years to develop

leaders and gain insight to enhance collaboration,

team building, problem solving, career develop-

ment, management training, counseling, and

conflict resolution. Foundational to the MBTI is

Carl Jung’s theory of dichotomous personality

types—extraversion/introversion, energy

sensing/ intuition, thinking/feeling, and

judging/ perceiving—which determine behaviors,

inclinations, and priorities, each innate to decision

making and significant to collaborative work.2

Extraversion is a preference for the outside

world, activities, and others. Introversion is a pref-

erence for personal thoughts, memories, and expe-

riences. A sensing preference is characterized by a

penchant for facts, concrete data, and specifics. An

intuition preference is characterized by a penchant

for assessing the big picture, focusing on relation-

ships, connections, and identifying patterns. Think-

ing reflects a person’s tendency to be objective in

decision making, stepping away from the circum-

stance to analyze and apply reasoning. Feeling

reflects a person’s tendency to be subjective in

decision making, stepping into the circumstance,

considering the impact on all stakeholders’ values,

and applying empathy. Judging indicates people

who prefer to organize the world. Perceiving indi-

cates people who prefer to experience the world.4

Methods

The purpose of this study was to assess the impact

of MBTI educational modules for personality type

comprehension and application by nurse leaders

to enhance collaborative decision making. A

shared governance council at a 228-bed facility

within a seven-hospital network in western

Copyright © 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

Team Concepts

Collaborative decision making:
Empowering nurse leaders
By Linda S. Burkett, DNP, MSN, RN, FCN

D ecision making is significant to every pro-

fessional organization, guiding trajectory

and success. Understanding the complexity

of decision making is imperative, as is rec-

ognizing the unique human dimensions inherent

in the decision-making process.1-3 Personality

type directly influences how individuals make

decisions. For this reason, decision making is an

elemental component of the Myers-Briggs Type

Indicator (MBTI), a 93 forced-choice-question

personality assessment tool. Corporations have

been using the MBTI for over 60 years to develop

leaders and gain insight to enhance collaboration,

team building, problem solving, career develop-

ment, management training, counseling, and

conflict resolution. Foundational to the MBTI is

Carl Jung’s theory of dichotomous personality

types—extraversion/introversion, energy

sensing/ intuition, thinking/feeling, and

judging/ perceiving—which determine behaviors,

inclinations, and priorities, each innate to decision

making and significant to collaborative work.2

Extraversion is a preference for the outside

world, activities, and others. Introversion is a pref-

erence for personal thoughts, memories, and expe-

riences. A sensing preference is characterized by a

penchant for facts, concrete data, and specifics. An

intuition preference is characterized by a penchant

for assessing the big picture, focusing on relation-

ships, connections, and identifying patterns. Think-

ing reflects a person’s tendency to be objective in

decision making, stepping away from the circum-

stance to analyze and apply reasoning. Feeling

reflects a person’s tendency to be subjective in

decision making, stepping into the circumstance,

considering the impact on all stakeholders’ values,

and applying empathy. Judging indicates people

who prefer to organize the world. Perceiving indi-

cates people who prefer to experience the world.4

Methods

The purpose of this study was to assess the impact

of MBTI educational modules for personality type

comprehension and application by nurse leaders

to enhance collaborative decision making. A

shared governance council at a 228-bed facility

within a seven-hospital network in western