In recent years, hackers have targeted medical records, from hospitals and other healthcare institutions, across the country. These records contain personal information, contact information, and most importantly, for the hackers, information that may prove useful in stealing an identity. Thus, healthcare organizations have made it a priority to protect patient records and privacy. However, with the influx of technological advancements and hacker determination, there is no perfect way to ensure that all records are secure and safe.

Photo Credit: Getty Images/Blend Images

In addition to medical records, privacy concerns are relevant with any patient chart in any setting. For example, a chart left open on a computer monitor in a patient room, employee passwords and log-in information, and new employee access and screening all represent other ways in which ethics and security merge in healthcare and nursing practice.

For this Discussion, you will consider the importance of ethics as it relates to security. You will also reflect on how these topics might affect clinical practice and the connection to nursing informatics.

To Prepare

  • Review the Learning Resources associated with the topics of ethics, cyber ethics, and security.
  • Consider the role of each of these topics for clinical practice, as well as the importance of understanding each of these topics.
  • Reflect on how COVID-19 might have impacted each of these topics, which reviewing the article, “The COVID-19 Pandemic Highlights Shortcomings in US Health Care Informatics Infrastructure: A Call to Action.”
By Day 3 of Week 9

Post a cohesive response that addresses the following for each of the topics of ethics, cyber ethics, and security:

  • Explain how each of the topics might impact clinical practice. Describe why it is important to understand how ethics applies to clinical practice. Be specific and provide examples.
  • How might ethics apply to informatics, e-health records, importance of passwords and security?
  • After reviewing the article, “The COVID-19 Pandemic Highlights Shortcomings in US Health Care Informatics Infrastructure: A Call to Action,” describe potential impacts of the pandemic on ethics and security as it applies to clinical practice. Be specific and provide examples.

C
o
p
y
r
i
g
h
t

2
0
1
5
.

A
m
e
r
i
c
a
n

N
u
r
s
e
s

A
s
s
o
c
i
a
t
i
o
n
.

A
l
l

r
i
g
h
t
s

r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.

M
a
y

n
o
t

b
e

r
e
p
r
o
d
u
c
e
d

i
n

a
n
y

f
o
r
m

w
i
t
h
o
u
t

p
e
r
m
i
s
s
i
o
n

f
r
o
m

t
h
e

p
u
b
l
i
s
h
e
r
,

e
x
c
e
p
t

f
a
i
r

u
s
e
s

p
e
r
m
i
t
t
e
d

u
n
d
e
r

U
.
S
.

o
r

a
p
p
l
i
c
a
b
l
e

c
o
p
y
r
i
g
h
t

l
a
w
.

EBSCO Publishing : eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) – printed on 4/28/2022 8:49 AM via
AN: 1021761 ; R2 Library (Online service), American Nurses Association.; Nursing Informatics : Scope and Standards of
Practice
Account: s6527200

Standards of Practice for
Nursing Informatics Nursing

Standard 1. Assessment
The informatics nurse collects comprehensive data,
information, and emerging evidence pertinent to the situation.

Standard 2. Diagnosis, Problems, and
Issues Identification
The informatics nurse analyzes assessment data to
identify diagnoses, problems, issues, and opportunities for
improvement.

Standard 3. Outcomes Identification
The informatics nurse identifies expected outcomes for a plan
individualized to the healthcare consumer or to the situation.

Standard 4. Planning
The informatics nurse develops a plan that prescribes strategies,
alternatives, and recommendations to attain expected outcomes.

Standard 5. Implementation
The informatics nurse implements the individualized plan.

Standard 5A. Coordination of Activities
The informatics nurse coordinates planned activities.

Standard 5B. Health Teaching and Health
Promotion
The informatics nurse employs informatics solutions and
strategies for education and teaching to promote health
and a safe environment.

Standard 5C. Consultation
The informatics nurse provides consultation to influence
the identified plan, enhance the abilities of others, and
effect change.

Standard 6. Evaluation
The informatics nurse evaluates progress toward attainment
of outcomes.

The Standards of
Practice for Nursing

Informatics describe a
competent level of nursing

care as demonstrated
by the critical thinking

model known as the
nursing process. The

nursing process includes
the components of

assessment, diagnosis,
outcomes identification,

planning, implementation,
and evaluation.

Accordingly, the nursing
process encompasses

significant actions taken
by nursing informatics
nurses and forms the

foundation of the nurse’s
decision-making.

source: American Nurses Association (2015). Nursing Informatics: Scope and
Standards of Practice, 2nd Edition. Silver Spring, MD: Nursesbooks.org.

ANA Standards of Nursing Informatics Practice

http://www.Nursingworld.org
© 2015 ANA

EBSCOhost – printed on 4/28/2022 8:49 AM

Vol.:(0123456789)1 3

Journal of Business Ethics (2019) 160:307–317
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-019-04213-9

E D I TO R I A L

Business and the Ethical Implications of Technology: Introduction
to the Symposium

Kirsten Martin1 · Katie Shilton2 · Jeffery Smith3

Received: 22 May 2019 / Accepted: 28 May 2019 / Published online: 13 June 2019
© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Abstract
While the ethics of technology is analyzed across disciplines from science and technology studies (STS), engineering,
computer science, critical management studies, and law, less attention is paid to the role that firms and managers play in
the design, development, and dissemination of technology across communities and within their firm. Although firms play
an important role in the development of technology, and make associated value judgments around its use, it remains open
how we should understand the contours of what firms owe society as the rate of technological development accelerates. We
focus here on digital technologies: devices that rely on rapidly accelerating digital sensing, storage, and transmission capa-
bilities to intervene in human processes. This symposium focuses on how firms should engage ethical choices in developing
and deploying these technologies. In this introduction, we, first, identify themes the symposium articles share and discuss
how the set of articles illuminate diverse facets of the intersection of technology and business ethics. Second, we use these
themes to explore what business ethics offers to the study of technology and, third, what technology studies offers to the
field of business ethics. Each field brings expertise that, together, improves our understanding of the ethical implications of
technology. Finally we introduce each of the five papers, suggest future research directions, and interpret their implications
for business ethics.

Keywords Technology · Socio-technical systems · Science and technology studies · Privacy · Values in design · Social
contract theory

Mobile phones track us as we shop at stores and can infer
where and when we vote. Algorithms based on commer-
cial data allow firms to sell us products they assume we
can afford and avoid showing us products they assume we
cannot. Drones watch our neighbors and deliver beverages
to fishermen in the middle of a frozen lake. Autonomous
vehicles will someday communicate with one another to
minimize traffic congestion and thereby energy consump-
tion. Technology has consequences, tests norms, changes
what we do or are able to do, acts for us, and makes biased
decisions (Friedman and Nissenbaum 1996). The use of
technology can also have adverse effects on people. Tech-
nology can threaten individual autonomy, violate privacy

rights (Laczniak and Murphy 2006), and directly harm indi-
viduals financially and physically. Technologies can also be
m